Some Florida residents being priced out as out-of-state people move there

Discussion in 'United States' started by kazenatsu, Jan 3, 2024.

  1. kazenatsu

    kazenatsu Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    So many people in the U.S. have been relocating to Florida that it is pricing out many people who were already living in Florida.

    Nearly 490,000 Americans left Florida last year for states including Georgia and Texas. The typical mover leaving Florida pulls in $48,000 a year, doesn't own a home, and isn't married.

    A Business Insider analysis of individual-level data from the Census Bureau's 2022 ACS, assembled by the University of Minnesota's IPUMS program, found that movers leaving Florida were slightly younger, more often single, and employed at higher rates than movers to Florida.

    While many are moving to Florida for its beaches, lack of state income tax, and business opportunities, many are getting priced out or seeking a quieter pace of life.

    Slightly more millennials moved from Florida than Gen Z at 32% and 28% respectively. Boomers, who made up nearly 24% of movers to Florida, were only 17.8% of those leaving.

    Though a greater percentage are employed, movers leaving Florida had an income of just $47,705 in 2022, compared to $55,115 for those moving in.

    David, 58, said in October he was moving to Georgia after nearly 40 years in West Palm Beach. He said he was making the move due to rising property taxes, burdensome home insurance costs, and wealthy newcomers altering the fabric of his community.
    "Their attitudes were so different from what everybody was used to; they were demanding people not familiar with the kind of calm lifestyle we were living. The population doubled with people different from others in our neighborhood."

    Steve Prevesk, 63 said he was gearing up to move away from Florida and move out west to California or Colorado. He moved to Florida in 2018 for a business opportunity after eight years in California, but the constant heat took a toll on him. "This is uninhabitable, you're walking to your car and you're soaking in sweat."

    Kim, 68, who asked to just use her first name for privacy reasons, made a similar decision to move from Florida to another part of the country. After 10 years in Flagler County, she was fed up with how the peaceful community she knew had become much more commercialized as wealthier people had moved in. After her home flooded in 2017 and seeing the politics of her area begin to shift, she decided to move to a mobile home in a small town in northern Vermont, where the cost of living is lower despite much colder weather.​

    Meet the typical mover leaving Florida: Millennials who aren't married and make $48,000 departing for Georgia and Texas, Business Insider, Noah Sheidlower, January 3, 2024

    A large number of the people moving to Florida are coming from the states of California and Florida. In fact, Florida recently surpassed Texas as a destination state for those leaving California.
    (source: Fewer Californians are moving to Texas, but more are going to Florida and Arizona Mike Schneider, Associated Press, October 19, 2023 )

    In fact, if I remember correctly, we have one member in this forum, said they live in a Florida beach town, who complained about all the Californians moving there, pushing up the cost of housing and being rude.
    A Ranger gave my mom a ticket for not having a pass even though she showed him her pass (post by Ryobi , posted in Law & Justice, March 2022 )


    related threads about people getting priced out by an influx of newcomers:
    Resort Towns in the Mountain West: How New Money Destroyed Old Communities (Oct 4, 2018, posted in United States section)
    California's population has spilled over into Texas
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2024
  2. FatBack

    FatBack Well-Known Member

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    Love how everyone trash talks Florida but they sure love moving here. And yes, lots of them rude and think we care how things work wherever they came from
     
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  3. kazenatsu

    kazenatsu Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    edit: I meant to write that "A large number of the people moving to Florida are coming from the states of California and New York."
     
  4. kazenatsu

    kazenatsu Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    Nearly 730,000 moved to the Sunshine State between 2021 and 2022, while almost 500,000 people left. Insider spoke with several people who have moved in and out of the state since the pandemic began.

    Those who moved in love the lifestyle, while those who moved out say the state got too expensive.

    Some people love Florida, but some hate it: the Sunshine State is undeniably divisive.

    About 730,000 newcomers moved into Florida between July 2021 and July 2022, while 500,000 residents moved out of state, according to census data.

    It's part of "the biggest migration" in a generation, said Holly Meyer Lucas, a real-estate agent in South Florida. People are tending to move in droves to lower-tax states, including Florida but also Texas and Arizona, she added. She also said that such dramatic relocation can result in tough realities, especially when wealthier people change the fabric of the new places they settle in, often pricing middle-class locals out.

    Take Chris Brown, a 25-year-old startup founder who joined the hordes of folks who moved to Florida in 2020. He left behind chilly Chicago for the sunny shores of Tampa and enjoys biking, swimming, and surfing. But then there are Floridians like Ryan and Jami Wilson, who moved to South Carolina with their two children after becoming frustrated with the state's crowds, rising cost of living, and traffic.

    Insider spoke with some Floridians who left because it was too expensive, too crowded, too hot, and too ritzy. They tended to move to places that are smaller and more affordable. We also interviewed several people who moved into the state, who say they love the food, the natural beauty, and the laid-back lifestyle. And experts and real-estate agents described the dynamics causing this movement into and out of the state.​

    "Stay or go: Why Americans are drawn to -- or sick of -- living in Florida", Business Insider (News)
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2024
  5. drluggit

    drluggit Well-Known Member

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    Go anywhere folks fleeing CA NY et al are moving to, and the results are the same. FL has always been a high cost of living state, at least along the coasts and where tourists flock. One hopes that the refugees don't insist on destroying the state/s they flee to.
     
  6. vman12

    vman12 Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    If their socialist utopias were so great, ask them why they're in Florida.
     
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  7. FatBack

    FatBack Well-Known Member

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    Amen to that. We need a wall on the Florida border with extreme vetting.

    I miss the old Florida I was born and raised in and I see way too much development but alas the only constant is change and no place is what it was 40 years ago.

    We grew up unsupervised using ATVs and guns in the woods by our young selves and no one was ever killed but of course the thought of such a thing would be horrifying in today's world
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2024
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  8. FatBack

    FatBack Well-Known Member

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    I'm met a customer at work the other night who proudly informed me that he had just moved here from Ohio.

    He was telling me how great it is here and I told him you should have seen the place 30 years ago before a thousand people a day started moving here and developers tearing down all the wild places and cattle pastures and orange groves to build cookie cutter subdivisions for the people that just keep coming.

    I really wanted to ask him.... It's not too late to move back, is it?

    There is a common bumper sticker around here that says the locals hate you, now hate is a very strong word but I won't argue with that bumper sticker. It's true.

    I won't say I hate them but I will certainly say I wish they would go back where they came from.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2024
  9. Curious Always

    Curious Always Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    This state is quickly becoming unaffordable for us.

    Our monthly escrow payment has jumped $1,400 in three years. Our insurance is now $8,500 and taxes are $6,500. The yearly jumps are not sustainable.

    The Florida legislature gave Citizens permission to pawn off customers to private insurers, as long as the new premium to homeowners doesn’t increase by more than 20%. We were one of the lucky ones whose insurance just jumped the exact amount allowed by law.

    When interest rates start going down again, we are getting out. Our current mortgage is 3.5%, so we’re not excited about current rates. (There’s a good chance the new house payment would still be dramatically less, though, even with the higher rates.)

    At least this low-class, petty, mean-spirited asshat of a governor will be gone, soon.
     
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  10. vman12

    vman12 Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    I hear CA, NY and IL is nice.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2024
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  11. Curious Always

    Curious Always Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    We’re thinking Kansas. Thanks for the recommendations, though. You couldn’t pay me to live in any of those states.
     
  12. FatBack

    FatBack Well-Known Member

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    If I was to ever move I would think about Arkansas or Louisiana or Texas or possibly the Carolinas. Mehhybeh jawga?
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2024
  13. FreshAir

    FreshAir Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    is maga moving there, following their Golden Calf?
     
  14. FreshAir

    FreshAir Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    Those States made them rich enough to price Floridians out?
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2024
  15. FatBack

    FatBack Well-Known Member

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    Unfortunately no, most are space Bidets. They camp out in on the left lane driving with their turn signal on for 2 mi and drive up property taxes and the cost of living and if enough of them move here I'm sure eventually we'll have state income tax.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2024
  16. FreshAir

    FreshAir Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    space Bidets must have lots of money
     
  17. FatBack

    FatBack Well-Known Member

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    Like the magas
     
  18. FreshAir

    FreshAir Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    must have, or Florida was really poor
     
  19. Curious Always

    Curious Always Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    What is a space bidet?
     
  20. kazenatsu

    kazenatsu Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    It partially has to do wealth, but it also has to do with overcrowding. Overcrowding will also push up prices, even when each person does not have a lot of money.
    For example, immigrants will often pack together with a large number of people crammed under the same roof, or people will spend a much larger share of their income on housing, because overcrowding often causes the price of housing to be bid up, as it causes housing shortages.
     
  21. FreshAir

    FreshAir Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    true, this is why if one lives in a great area, they don't attack others in over crowded areas and tell them how great it is where they are
     
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  22. Hotdogr

    Hotdogr Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    I have some personal experience with this.

    In 2018, I bought a lovely house in Punta Gorda FL on the north side of the Peace River in the Harbor Heights neighborhood. (very near to where @FatBack lives) We were on a canal with direct access to the river, and on out to the Gulf of Mexico, with a private boat dock in my back yard. Our plan was to sell our farm in NC and retire down there. My wife moved permanently to FL, and I would "snowbird" while preparing our NC property for sale, and liquidating everything. Was all working to plan, but way slower and more stressful than we had hoped.

    The 2020 hurricane season was very stressful for us. Native Floridians cope with it every year with grace, somehow. But I was in NC, and my wife in FL, and every storm that approached the gulf coast was torture for me. After hurricane season was over, even though we never had any storm damage, or made any claim of any kind, our insurance dropped us. The cheapest policy we could find was nearly double what we had, and what we had was already really expensive. I could see how people on a fixed income, faced with that, would have no good choice but to move.

    In 2021, Covid was in full swing, and the mass exodus of the vertical people flooded down from the draconian states, buying up every property at crazy prices. We decided that, just out of curiosity, we'd put our house on the market for double what we paid just two years earlier. Four days after going to market, we had a full-price, as-is offer from a cash buyer; a nice couple from NYC. They wanted to forego any inspections and close in 7 days. We would have been idiots to have turned down this opportunity, so we didn't.

    In 2022, the center of hurricane Ian went pretty much right over that house. I do not know what effect Ian ultimately had on it, but I can't imagine it went unscathed. It was only 8 feet above mean high tide. I thank my lucky stars that we sold it when we did.
     

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