Succulents

Discussion in 'Survival and Sustainability' started by daisydotell, Sep 8, 2011.

  1. daisydotell

    daisydotell Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    Succulents are addictive if you have one you want more. If you are a succulent lover please share your comments and pictures.

    I will share one of the pictures I took of a frog that snuggled down in the coolness of one of my plants. The coolness of the plant may have reminded him of his mother..who knows. [​IMG]
     
  2. daisydotell

    daisydotell Well-Known Member Past Donor

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  3. daisydotell

    daisydotell Well-Known Member Past Donor

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  4. gypzy

    gypzy New Member

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    Crassula Morgan's Beauty: [​IMG]

    Portulacaria Afra (Variegated Elephant Bush): [​IMG] intended for bonsai --

    my inspiration was: [​IMG]

    freshly planted gift, rootless (and beloved) Aloe "Partridge Breast": [​IMG]
     
  5. gypzy

    gypzy New Member

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    I paid way too much money for a 6" piece of stalk, no roots, no leaves. Took five years for me to get blooms. What a joy to finally discover the color of the flowers, each lasting for weeks.
    The first inflo on my plumeria:

    [​IMG]

    It smells like perfume! ... no exaggeration, promise.



    Okay, I'm outta here for tonight...but ah'll be bahk!
     
  6. daisydotell

    daisydotell Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    That is an absolutly gorgeous plumeria. You can pick the flowers string them together and make leis..:-D I would have thought where you lived would be too cold in the winter. How does your plant winter? You must keep it in a green house.
    When I lived way down south...I had quite a few of them growing. They are so easy to grow once they get started. On one of my walks I found some cutting that someone had thrown out. I gathered them up and planted them..most of them survived. Mine were yellow and pink. One was a bright yellow very pretty. If I had not turned into a gypsy because of my husbands work I would have a jungle now. But we moved and someone else got to enjoy my scavenged plumeria.
     
  7. gypzy

    gypzy New Member

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    Your topsy turvy looks delightfully healthy!
    A well-established plant will easily take mid-20s as long as it is kept dry.

    The second plant is a graptoveria. It looks suspiciously like a Van Keppel.
    [​IMG]
    source However did you get this one? Am likely to beg for a pup come spring. :blushes:

    I have a bucket with Graptopetulum Superbum and Graptopetulum Paraguynese, and Graptoveria Debbie. All but Debbie have survived the heatwave w/one watering, moved into 85% shade. I've never brought them in for winter, I have thrown clear plastic over the bucket when winter rains were excessive. Virtually all of the grapto-crosses are very hardy plants, growing from Mexico to Canada.

    Pic #3 is an echeveria glauca hybrid -- who knows which one?! There are too many, and I'm outta my paygrade. You'd have to take it to a C&S forum for an exact tag. It also looks quite healthy...lots of pups under there I see! planning a new pot in the spring?

    FTR - the yellowing leaf (left, front) is best left there. I know it can be tempting to pluck those (esp when snapping pix) but the plant is in the process of resorbing the water/nutrients it has stored there. Eventually it will seal the leaf off and it will drop. If ya can't resist, try and get a little powdered cinnamon on the stalk to discourage any fungus, etc, and don't water until the site hardens off.

    Daisy, where are you finding your plants? The local bigbox? Thank gawd for WallyWorld.
    Their plants are always abused, always mislabeled...and always in desperate need of a new home, those little cart jumpers!; I've had thousands through the years.
     
  8. gypzy

    gypzy New Member

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    Thank you, m'am! Like I said, it was a delightful surprise upon arrival.
    and not all are scented -- so double bonus!

    Believe it or not, these are not even Hawaiian natives - they're Caribbean and were carried to Hawaii by sailors. It is also known as frangipani.

    Peach, anyone can grow a plumeria! As long as you have a grow season with night temps over 60. Plumeria goes to sleep as soon as temps drop below about 50. The plant itself will tell you when it is time: the leaves will begin to curl, then yellow, then drop. Take it in the house and sit it in a closet with the vacuum. It requires only that you don't water it...it will kindly wait for spring, temps over 50, and you moving it into morning sun to kick-start it again. Once you see it "pushing horns" give it a drink of water and you're off to the races!

    However, leave it to even a light frost and it will be certain death.
    But like I said, the plant will tell you well ahead of time, if you heed the signs.

    Note: plumeria flowers on old wood only, and then branches at the base of the inflo
    If you trim to encourage branching you must wait a season for flowers on those branches, however if there were flowers on the branch you removed, it will bloom if you go ahead and root it
    (no water before roots!!!).
     
  9. Kimi

    Kimi Well-Known Member

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    This is great! I'm going to enjoy this thread!
     
  10. gypzy

    gypzy New Member

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    It's probably too late in the season now but come spring we should all go to our local WallyWorld and bring home one succy to photo, upload, and discuss. Fun stuff!!!
     
  11. gypzy

    gypzy New Member

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    sempervivum italicum

    [​IMG]

    Rome: [​IMG]
    UK: [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  12. gypzy

    gypzy New Member

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  13. daisydotell

    daisydotell Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    Frangipangis I love that name better than plumeria. My neighbor always called them franzytanzies. She thought it was so neat that I had salvaged them from someones clippings. Gypzy I am so glad you said no wet root.. Mine I just stuck in a hole and covered the dirt in and they never missed a beat. Some people would never believe that. They grew into beautiful plants.
    I also rooted a gumbo limbo the same way and a strangler fig. The strangler fig eventually had to go because he invaded the drain field...lol. That was a bit of a mess.
     
  14. Trinnity

    Trinnity Banned

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    You're killing me daisy.

    I got up after looking at this thread and went shopping. Couldn't find much.
    Got some hens and biddies and some coral carpet sedum.

    [​IMG]
    I know I can keep them outside all winter, but will they live if I bring them in and they don't get a lot of sun?
     
  15. daisydotell

    daisydotell Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    The one you are calling Van Keppel was a gift. My bug lady saw my sempers and she said I have something for you. She brought me a piece and I put it in a pot and it just loves life. It has filled 4 pots.. You may have as much of it as you want. It just loves to live and it is not particular about how it is treated. If it were a person it would be the type that just loves everyone..lol.
    I have another one that I almost killed it is all rose colored and temperamental is not the word for this one. I hold my breath hoping it will live and multiply but it is stingy with wanting to do anything.
    Once upon on a time an aloe called tiger aloe. The cold killed my aloe last winter and I haven't replaced it but it was just the common variety. I like to keep aloe for burns.
     
  16. gypzy

    gypzy New Member

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    And since we are on Sempervivums (aka Hen&Chicks aka house leeks), I thought I'd share some lovely arrangements I ran across while surfing.

    Inspiration:
    [​IMG] s. arachnoid (not my fav plant but Love the pot!)
    [​IMG] even a brick will do
    [​IMG] great play on subtle hues!
     
  17. daisydotell

    daisydotell Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    I bring my plants in when there is going to be a hard freeze and take them back out after the threat is over. I can't trust them to take care of themselves outside. Sometimes I put them on the porch and cover them with polar fleece to keep them warm.
    Gypzy may have better infor..She is more the expert....I am still learning.
     
  18. daisydotell

    daisydotell Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    When I was young I love plants even then..I remember a succulent that my grandmother had It looked very similar to this except the leaves were more scalloped and it seems like they were looking down rather than up and the plant had spikes of blooms that were pinkish coral ...any ideas? I thought it looked really pretty and it was prolific. I am sure it was kalanchoe but I haven't seen one like it in a long time. [​IMG]
     
  19. daisydotell

    daisydotell Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    Here is Theodore and part of the Hoya Vine. It was either Theo or Thaddeus that uncoved it on the porch and it froze. I managed to save a piece of it but the vine in the picture was years of labor. The blooms on it were striking. They looked like wax flowers in a cluster....[​IMG]
     
  20. gypzy

    gypzy New Member

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    Here are a few succulent bowls from The Succulent Queen herself. Enjoy:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Thanks for all your inspiration, RoRo!
     
    Trinnity and (deleted member) like this.
  21. gypzy

    gypzy New Member

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    Yeah, I like frangi too, especially when referring to the "fragrant" ones, seems fitting.

    If there are no roots, there is nothing (no mechanism) to draw the water up; the plants sit in water and this rots the base of the stalk. Catch it in time and you can cut the stalk back to nice healthy tissue and try again...but how many times can you do that before you have no stick, right?

    plumeria trivia - it's in the same family as oleander, poinsettias and Madagascar palms...and adenium: euphorbiacea.
    You can tell the members of this family by their milky white sap (yes, it is toxic, keep it away from your eyes).

    and...now you know why them figs are called stranglers? hehehehe...sorry...
     
  22. gypzy

    gypzy New Member

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    :mrgreen: The succulent bug. :-D warms my heart :mrgreen:

    I believe that is a pic of sedum rubrotinctum aurora aka pork and beans
    Good to mid 20s when dry, protect from hard freezes.
    An excellent accent plant against green foliage.
    [​IMG]

    Now show us those hens!
     
  23. gypzy

    gypzy New Member

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    I've gone back and looked at your plant several times today. If it is Van Keppel, I'm surprised (and envious). If it is not, it is certainly a sport of one of the parents, graptopetalum paraguayense:
    [​IMG]

    The clue is in how turgid the leaves are, and likely the blooms. The X with echeveria will have given it a more turgid leaf. A bit of research could dig up the flowers for each. That's often the clincher.

    Post a pic of the other and we'll see if we can id it and its ailment.
    btw -- the more you pamper sux, the quicker they die.

    I have lost roughly 50 species of aloe in 2011. I feel your pain. <-- best bubba voice
     
  24. gypzy

    gypzy New Member

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    Well flip, I had to come back to this.

    But first, sharing what's on the TV screen
    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aaWo5CcfEVw"]ACL 1982 [/ame]
    out-freaking-standing....okay...where were we?​

    Bring them in during winter? I wouldn't unless you are going below 25-30. If you do, set them in a West facing window and stop watering. Turn them one-quarter round each week to help stave off the etiolation. Succulents will grow towards the light and stretch, losing their compact form.

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mnhK249pVfc"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mnhK249pVfc[/ame]
    grrww...mercy!


    No, really, stop watering them.








    yes, even when the beans begin to drop. Better to lose some beans on top than rot the roots underneath.
     
  25. Trinnity

    Trinnity Banned

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    Here....

    [​IMG]

    They're just little clusters in 4" pots like the green one above, but more than one....clusters of varying sizes...

    I paid 5.99 for one and got two more that were little for free. I'm always finagling a deal....always.
    My motto: If ya don't ask, ya don't get.

    Oh and I got the sedum for half price...$3. End of season leftovers...healthy.

    I will be looking for more...now. I've got the bug. Always did, but forgot....

    The obsession has reared its succulent head. Oh nooooooooooooooooooo
     

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